featured gallery for October 2017

IF YOU DON'T SCREAM, IT'S BECAUSE YOU'RE DEAD

The artworks selected as well as the following text, based on personal and third person experiences, introduce viewers to the violent narratives and imagery with which HIV+ people interact. It is in these memories—explored and redefined when viewed in hindsight—where we can reposition ourselves and rethink our very own histories as individuals and community, which allows us to access a politicized space of consciousness. My original version in Spanish follows the English translation. 

IF YOU DON'T SCREAM, IT'S BECAUSE YOU'RE DEAD

Eugenio Echeverría

I

Those healthy-balanced people stabbed me the thousand times they feared me. One thousand days to build our humanity. What do I do with your hate, which is now my history? That’s why I can’t sleep at night and I’m exhausted all day. What do I do with your hate? (The one I believed, the one I use to harm myself, to despise you.)

II

D. told me he knew he was destined to die of AIDS. He threatened me several times, but even so I never dared respond: Me too. That’s what they told me, and I believed it when I was 13 years old. At 17 and at 25. At 26? I demanded to the nurse: “Why am I not infected? He is infected. He fucked me. He came inside me. I bled. Why hasn’t he infected me?”

His virus and your cells are not genetically compatible.

III

But that night, at 5:17 in the morning, I asked him if he had AIDS. He told me no. I knew he was lying because Death drew out from his breath; she told me quietly: “He is infected. He is infected. He is infected.” I fell asleep while listening (…) I couldn’t take the doses of the after-exposure treatment that the social-worker-doctor-nurse protocol told me. Too weak, too know-it-all, too “that-guy-has-troubles” (when I inhale, I fall asleep). And so, in truth, that night was only one more night: dried-up words, fear in front and behind, that chemistry that drags through the air until it reaches my nostrils.

The psychologist: “Four years until you get AIDS and then one or two more years (until you die).” I became deaf and dumb. That’s why I pretend not to feel anything when they tell me: “Damn. I’m sorry.” “You are a bitch,” another one told me eight years later. “You’re very skinny in that picture. Very.” Nobody asked  them, but they needed to say their piece.

IV

Tomorrow we’re going to that hospital. We’ll go at night, at two in the morning. When we get there, you must let me do the talking, you just need to show your HIV+ face. I’ll tell them you’ve lost a lot of weight during the last weeks, that you’ve been having diarrhea for a long time; that you’re depressed, that you just found out a short time ago and you’re not handling it well. They’ll take your information and check you in. Tell them what they want to hear. Once they’ve given you a subsequent appointment, you’re in, you’re in. They’re never short of meds here, the labs are free and, because it’s a hospital, they’ll treat you for everything else.

Thanks for helping me out. I’ll help others, too, once I’m inside.

V

And then there were one (F), two (A), three (G) and four (S). But they weren’t ALL. That guy, M., black, handsome, cuir... died of AIDS (in 2017 and since 1984, every day, several times a day). His friends got together, cried over his death and a few of them got infected months later, because of loyalty. What happened to us was a few years earlier. When they told us, we thought “At last!” When they told us, we cried. We stopped the day, covered our eyes with our arms, and cried for the two of us, for everyone, even for you.

VI

“That guy didn’t die because of AIDS; the stigma killed him.” (You don’t need to offer an explanation: the stigma I carry against myself, which makes me live in a state of violence. The hatred I don’t know how to handle, the one I refuse to disguise. I've been hiding all my life.) “That guy didn’t die because of AIDS; the violence killed him.” (The violence that you love so much, the one that calms you when you close your eyes, the one you surrender to when you say “Damn. I’m sorry…”)

There is no peace: that guy and us, we withstand humanity. You do so, too. 

SI NO GRITAS, ES PORQUE ESTÁS MUERTO

Eugenio Echeverría

I

Esos sanos-equilibrados me apuñalaron las mil veces que me tuvieron miedo. Mil días para construir nuestra humanidad. ¿Qué hago con tu odio, que es ahora mi historia? Por eso no puedo dormir en las noches y tengo sueño durante el día.¿Qué hago con tu odio? (El que me creí, con el que me daño, con el que te desprecio.)

II

D. me dijo que se sabía destinado a morir de SIDA. Me amenazó varias veces y aun así nunca me atreví a responderle: “Yo también. Así me lo dijeron y así me lo creí a los 13 años.” A los 17 y a los 25… ¿A los 26? le exigí a la enfermera: “¿Porqué no me he infectado? Él lo está, me cogió él a mí, se vino dentro, sangré. ¿Por qué no me ha infectado?”

Su virus y tus células no son genéticamente compatibles.

III

Pero esa noche, a las 5:17 de la madrugada, le pregunté si tenía sida. Me dijo que no. Sabía que mentía porque de su aliento nacía la muerte y ella me lo dijo, quedito: “Está infectado. Está infectado. Está infectado.” Me quedé dormido escuchando (…) No pude hacer las tomas del tratamiento post-exposición según me lo dijo el trabajador-social-doctora-enfermero-protocolo. Demasiado débil, demasiado verga, demasiado “este-chico-tiene-problemas” (cuando inhalo me duermo). Así que esa noche fue, en realidad, una noche más: palabras secas, miedo por delante y por detrás, esa química que se arrastra por el aire hasta mis fosas.

Psicóloga: “Cuatro años hasta que te de SIDA y después uno o dos años más (hasta que te mueras)”. Me hice mudo y sordo. Por eso hago ver que no siento nada cuando me dicen “Chale. Lo siento…” “Puta”, me dijo otro 8 años después. "Estás muy delgado en esa foto. Muy.” Nadie les preguntó, pero ellos necesitaban hablar.

IV

Mañana iremos al hospital. Iremos en la noche, a las dos de la madrugada. Cuando lleguemos tienes que dejarme hablar a mí, tu sólo pon cara de sidoso. Les diré que has perdido mucho peso en las últimas semanas, que tienes diarrea de hace mucho, que estás deprimido, que te enteraste hace muy poco y no lo estás pudiendo manejar. Te tomarán unos datos y te revisarán. Diles lo que quieren escuchar. Una vez te hayan dado cita subsecuente, ya estas dentro, ya estas dentro. Aquí nunca hay desabasto, los estudios son gratis y, por ser hospital, te tratan todo lo demás.

Gracias por ayudarme. Yo ayudaré a otros también, una vez dentro.

V

Y fueron uno (P.), dos (U.), tres (T.), cuatro (O.) y cinco (S.). Pero no fueron TODOS. Ese chico M., negro, guapo, cuir... murió de SIDA (en 2017 y desde 1984, todos los días, varias veces al día). Sus amigos se unieron, lloraron su muerte y unos pocos de ellos se infectaron meses después, por lealtad. Lo nuestro fue unos años antes. Cuando nos lo dijeron, pensamos “¡Por fin!” Cuando nos lo dijeron, lloramos. Paramos el día, nos llevamos el antebrazo a los ojos, y lloramos por los dos, por todos, hasta por ti.

VI

“Ese chico no murió de SIDA, fue el estigma el que lo mató.” (No tienes por qué dar explicaciones: el estigma que cargo contra mí mismo, por el que vivo en estado de violencia. El odio que no se manejar, el que me niego a disimular. Llevo toda la vida escondiéndome.) “Ese chico no murió de SIDA, fue la violencia la que lo mató” (Esa que tanto te gusta, la que te calma cuando cierras los ojos, a la que te entregas cuando dices “Chale. Lo siento…”)

No hay paz: ese chico y nosotros vomitamos humanidad. Tú también.